Chem 4000 Seminar

Moderator: Ron Robertson

Chem 4000 Seminar

Postby Ron Robertson » Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:01 pm

Welcome to Seminar!

This is where I will communicate quickly with the class as a whole. This is especially important in this class as the schedule can quickly change due to an additional speaker or the cancellation of a speaker. Although anyone can read these posts (it is an open board) only those who have approved usernames can register and post. I will talk about this on Friday. See you then.
Ron Robertson
 
Posts: 413
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 10:49 am

Re: Chem 4000 Seminar

Postby Ron Robertson » Thu Jan 16, 2014 5:36 pm

I have just finished registering and activating the accounts of all those who have not taken P Chem. Your username is First name and Last name as listed in the official class list. Your password is the last 4 digits of your "A" number. Let me know if you have trouble logging in. I have disabled all new registration to eliminate hackers into our board. Two points extra credit for posting a message by next Friday.
Ron Robertson
 
Posts: 413
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 10:49 am

Re: Chem 4000 Seminar

Postby Ron Robertson » Fri Jan 17, 2014 6:29 pm

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fe/MCHMstructure.png For 2 pts extra credit, what is the significance and use of this compound?
Ron Robertson
 
Posts: 413
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 10:49 am

Re: Chem 4000 Seminar

Postby Lesleigh Stanfill » Tue Jan 21, 2014 6:02 pm

Ron Robertson wrote:http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fe/MCHMstructure.png For 2 pts extra credit, what is the significance and use of this compound?


It is used in the process of cleaning coal. The compound is found in some air fresheners to help control air content. Nine Counties in West Virginia were put under a state of emergency on January 9, 2014 due to a leak at a nearby chemical facility that had this compound in their possession. Kanawha, Putnam, Boone, Jackson, Lincoln, Roane, Clay, Logan and some areas in Cabell county were not allowed to use their water for cooking, drinking, or washing if it was supplied by West Virginia American Water.
Lesleigh Stanfill
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2014 5:23 pm

Re: Chem 4000 Seminar

Postby Ron Robertson » Tue Jan 21, 2014 6:30 pm

Cha Ching! 4 pts for Lesleigh, 2 for posting and 2 for answering the question.
Ron Robertson
 
Posts: 413
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 10:49 am

Re: Chem 4000 Seminar

Postby Ron Robertson » Wed Jan 22, 2014 2:44 pm

Good C&E News article on the chemical above. http://cen.acs.org/articles/92/i3/Toxicity-Unknown.html
Ron Robertson
 
Posts: 413
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 10:49 am

Re: Chem 4000 Seminar

Postby Bryan Wheeler » Fri Jan 24, 2014 2:57 pm

http://cen.acs.org/articles/92/i3/Toxicity-Unknown.html
According to the news article, the managing director of Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board said it was a new chemical, one not previously encountered in other investigations. Little is known about 4-methylcycloheanemethanol (MCHM), and most hazard information records are incomplete. This is scary: What other chemicals are used for which we don't have a good understanding?
Bryan Wheeler
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2014 5:24 pm

Re: Chem 4000 Seminar

Postby MSellick » Fri Jan 24, 2014 6:15 pm

This is interesting. I wonder what Dr. Mann has to say about this situation--in Toxicology we talked about superfund sites (so hopefully this won't turn into one! So from the news articles I was reading...no one has died from this? So that is good. I can't imagine the panic and distress all of those people are going through!
MSellick
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2013 11:54 am

Re: Chem 4000 Seminar

Postby Tiffani Kirkland » Fri Jan 24, 2014 7:29 pm

This is somewhat related to the compound being discussed, but how do chemists go about discovering the hazards of chemicals like (4-methylcyclohexyl)-methanol?
Tiffani Kirkland
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2014 5:20 pm

Re: Chem 4000 Seminar

Postby Ron Robertson » Sat Jan 25, 2014 10:06 am

Tiffani,

How is the problem. Relatively easy screening tests can be used to assess the lethal dose level or the possibility of DNA changes on very low organisms, but the question always is, "how does this extrapolate to humans?". Testing is then done on higher and higher organisms as the need arises but the time and cost for such studies is always a factor. Unfortunately we accumulate some toxicity data on humans due to accidental poisoning. Dr. Mann would be the most knowledgeable in our department on this subject for sure.
Ron Robertson
 
Posts: 413
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 10:49 am

Next

Return to Department of Chemistry Discussion Board

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron